IMAGE MAKER BEAUTY INSTITUTE. Drug-Free Workplace Policy

IMAGE MAKER BEAUTY INSTITUTE

Drug-Free Workplace Policy The following Drug-Free Workplace Policy is to notify all employees and students that pursuan

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IMAGE MAKER BEAUTY INSTITUTE

Drug-Free Workplace Policy The following Drug-Free Workplace Policy is to notify all employees and students that pursuant to the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (Public Law 101-690) and [California Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1990], Image Maker Beauty Institute prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of a controlled substance in the workplace, on school property, or as part of any school activity. Image Maker Beauty Institute similarly prohibits the unlawful use, possession, and distribution of alcohol in the workplace, on school property, or as part of any school activity, as well as any other unlawful conduct involving alcohol. For the purpose of this statement, the site for performance of work done in connection with grants, and thus the drug-free workplace, consists of all locations where Image Maker Beauty Institute does business. This includes, but is not limited to all lecture classrooms, parking lot, all administrative offices, corridors, storage rooms, and any space to be added in the future. Health Risks: The abuse of narcotics, depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, or alcohol can cause serious detriment to a person’s health. The health risks associated with the misuse of the previously mentioned drugs vary but include, and are not limited to: convulsions, coma, paralysis, irreversible brain damage, tremors, fatigue, paranoia, insomnia, and possible death. Drug and alcohol abuse is extremely harmful to a person’s health, interferes with productivity and alertness, and working while under the influence of drugs or alcohol could be a danger to the employee or student under the influence and fellow workers and students. Described below are some of the additional dangers and symptoms relative to use/abuse: Marijuana: Commonly known as “pot,” it is a plant with the botanical name of cannabis sativa. Pot is almost always smoked but can be ingested. Use causes the central nervous system to become disorganized and confused. Most users experience an increase in heart rate, reddening of eyes and dryness of the throat and mouth. Studies have proven that marijuana’s mental effects include temporary impairment of shortterm memory and an altered sense of time. It also reduces the ability to perform tasks

requiring concentration, swift reactions, and coordination. Feelings of euphoria, relaxation, and bouts of exaggerated laughter are also commonly reported. Smoking “pot” may cause: brain chemical changes, an altered reality, physically damaged lungs, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, lung cancer, a weakened immune system, damage to sperm in males, irregular menstrual cycles in females, reduced fertility and sex drive. Cocaine/Crack Cocaine: is a stimulant drug, which is derived from the coca plant. Street cocaine is available in the form of a powder or a “rock” of crack and is most commonly inhaled or smoked. Cocaine increases the heart rate and blood pressure and is very addictive. Crack is a form of smokable cocaine named for the popping sound it makes when burned. It is a mixture of cocaine, baking soda, and water. It is 5–10 times more potent than cocaine and is extremely dangerous. It has been reported that addiction can occur with as few as two “hits.” Some of the symptoms of cocaine/crack abuse are: personality changes, unexplained weight loss, excess sniffing and coughing, insomnia, depression, irritability, neglect of responsibility toward work, school, family, and friends, and panic attacks. Alcohol: In small doses, alcohol has a tranquilizing effect on most people, although it appears to stimulate others. Alcohol first acts on those parts of the brain that affect self-control and other learned behaviors; lowered self-control often leads to the aggressive behavior associated with those who drink. Alcohol use can also quickly cause dehydration, coordination problems, and blurred vision. In large doses, alcohol can dull sensation and impair muscular coordination, memory, and judgment. Taken in larger quantities over a long period of time, alcohol can damage the liver and heart and cause brain damage and a great number of other health, medical, and social issues. Hallucinogens: These are also known as psychedelics. The effects vary; the same person may have different reactions on different occasions. Most users are affected by changes in time and space perception, delusions, and hallucinations. The effects may be mild or overwhelming, depending on the dose and quantity or the drug. Physical reactions range from minor changes such as dilated pupils, a rise in temperature and heartbeat, to tumors. High doses can greatly alter the state of consciousness. After taking a hallucinogenic, the user loses control of thought processes. Although many perceptions are pleasant, others may cause panic or may make a person believe that he or she cannot be harmed. These delusions can be quite dangerous. Heroin: Heroin is a narcotic, which relieves pain and induces sleep. Commonly known as “junk” or “smack,” heroin is a highly addictive depressant and has been attributed as the cause of many deaths. Obvious symptoms include “pin point pupils,” drowsy, lethargic, slurred speech, and an inability to concentrate. Related medications used to treat pain include oxycontin and oxycodone, methadone, and codeine. The abuse of painkillers ranks second only to the abuse of marijuana in the United States. Heroin users experience a high rate of infectious diseases due to a weakened immune system and dirty needles shared by users. Children can be born addicted or can become addicted from heroin in the mother’s milk.

Crystal Methamphetamine: Crystal methamphetamine is a colorless, odorless powerful and highly addictive synthetic (man-made) stimulant. Crystal methamphetamine typically resembles small fragments of glass or shiny blue-white “rocks” of various sizes. Like powdered methamphetamine, crystal methamphetamine produces long-lasting euphoric effects. Crystal methamphetamine, however, typically has a higher purity level and may produce even longerlasting and more intense physiological effects than the powdered form of the drug. Crystal methamphetamine use is associated with numerous serious physical problems. The drug can cause rapid heart rate, increased blood pressure, and damage to the small blood vessels in the brain, which can lead to stroke. Chronic use of the drug can result in inflammation of the heart lining. Overdoses can cause hyperthermia (elevated body temperature), convulsions, and death. Individuals who use crystal methamphetamine also may have episodes of violent behavior, paranoia, anxiety, confusion, and insomnia. The drug can produce psychotic symptoms that persist for months or years after an individual has stopped using the drug. Crystal methamphetamine users who inject the drug expose themselves to additional risks, including contracting HIV (human immunodeficiency virus); methamphetamine users also risk scarred or collapsed veins, infections of the heart lining and valves, abscesses, pneumonia, tuberculosis, and liver or kidney disease. Depressants: Depressants are highly addictive. They are usually known as “downers.” A user may be drowsy, lethargic, suffer from memory loss, and have slurred speech. Many lawful drugs that have a depressant feature are from the family of drugs called barbiturates. More serious effects of the abuse of downers are liver damage, paradoxical anxiety and excited rage, coma, and death. Ecstasy: (MDMA) Also known as XTC, X, and E, Ecstasy is a mind-altering drug with hallucinogenic and speed-like side effects. Often used at raves, it is taken to promote loss of inhibition, excited-ness, euphoria, energy, and sexual stimulation. Ecstasy increases the amounts of serotonin in a person’s brain, which causes increased energy and cheerfulness; it also contains anti-coagulative properties, which can cause a person to bleed to death if injured. Ecstasy can also cause serious brain damage in a short time. Side effects of ecstasy are: depression, increase in heart rate and blood pressure, muscle tension, nausea, blurred vision, faintness, chills, brain damage, organ damage, and death. Similar “designer drugs” include MDEA and MDA (also known as “Adam” and “Eve”). Ritalin: Methylphenidate (Ritalin) is a medication prescribed for individuals (usually children) who have an abnormally high level of activity or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It contains amphetamines and can be abused as a stimulant by those other than for whom prescribed. When abused, the tablets are either taken orally or crushed and snorted. Some abusers dissolve the tablets in water and inject the mixture — complications can arise from this because insoluble fillers in the tablets can block small blood vessels. GHB: Gamma-hydroxyl butyrate is an intoxicating chemical with medical, recreational, and potentially dangerous uses. Its use is illegal for any purpose in the United States. Nicknamed the “date rape drug,” it is a clear liquid often mixed in drinks to promote relaxation or increased sociability. When taken, side effects can be: drowsiness, dizziness, vomiting, amnesia, decreased motor skills, slurring of speech, unrouseable sleep (coma), and death. GHB was used

as a dietary supplement until banned by the FDA. GHB is now illegal in the United States. Common slang names for GHB are: G, Liquid X, GBH, Gamma-oh, Blue Verve, Grievous Bodily Harm, Goop, and EZLay.

Drug Conviction Notification and Imposed Sanctions: • Any employee or student must notify Image Maker Beauty Institute of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace no later than five days after such a conviction. • Within 30 days after receiving notice of an employee or student conviction, Image Maker Beauty Institute will impose corrective measures on the employee or student convicted of drug abuse violations in the workplace by: 1. Taking appropriate action against the employee or student up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution and/or 2. Requiring such employee or student to participate satisfactorily in a drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation program approved for such purposes be a federal, state, or local health, law enforcement, or other appropriate agency.

Where can students and staff go for help?

Pathfinder, Inc. 615-374-9397 885 Highway 231 South Castalian Springs, Tennessee 37031 615-248-1905 615-831-1050 615-831-1050 615-931-1050 855-274-7471 855-900-2171 615-848-0773 615-831-1050 615-848-0065 615-333-6066

Drug Abuse and Addiction Information and Treatment Centers Harm Reduction Therapy Clinic National Institute on Drug Abuse Alcohol Abuse Alcoholics Anonymous World Services National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Rapid Detox Treatment Access Services Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) ACOA (Adult Children of Alcoholics) AL-NON (Family & Friends of Alcoholics)

The Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Referral Hotline: 855-274-7471

Laws Relating to Drug Violations: Attached is a list of violation codes associated with the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, or use of any controlled substance. Any employee or student violating any of the described laws of the Health and Safety Code or the Business and Professional Code could be subject to fines and imprisonment.

Controlled Substances Act Schedule I and II Drugs & Quantities:  Methamphetamine (5 gm or more pure, or 50 gm or more mixture or substance)  Heroin (100 gm or more mixture or substance)  Cocaine, Coca Leaves, Ecgonine (500 gm or more mixture or substance)  Cocaine Base (28 gm or more mixture or substance)  PCP (10 gm or more pure, or 100 gm or more mixture or substance)  LSD (1 gm or more mixture or substance)  Fentanyl (40 gm or more mixture or substance)  Fentanyl Analogue (10 gm or more mixture or substance)

1st Offense  Not less than 5 years. Not more than 40 years.  If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years or more than life  Fine of not more than $5 million individual, $25 million other than individual  Supervised release at least 4 years

2nd Offense  Not less than 10 years. Not more than life.  If death or serious injury, life imprisonment.  Fine of not more than $8 million individual, $50 million other than individual  Supervised release at least 8 years

Controlled Substances Act Schedule I and II Drugs & Quantities:  Methamphetamine (50 gm or more pure, or 500 gm or more mixture or substance)  Heroin (1 kg or more mixture or substance)  Cocaine, Coca Leaves, Ecgonine (5 kg or more mixture or substance)  Cocaine Base (280 gm or more mixture or substance)  PCP (100 gm or more pure, or 1 kg or more mixture or substance)  LSD (10 gm or more mixture or substance)  Fentanyl (400 gm or more mixture or substance)  Fentanyl Analogue (100 gm or more mixture or substance) 

1st Offense  Not less than 10 years. Not more than life  If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years or more than life  Fine of not more than $10 million individual, $50 million other than individual  Supervised release at least 5 years

2nd Offense  Not less than 20 years. Not more than life.  If death or serious injury, life imprisonment  Fine of not more than $20 million individual, $75 million other than individual  Supervised release at least 10 years

Controlled Substances Act Schedule I and II Drugs & Quantities:  Others (included in Schedules I and II are gamma hydroxybutyric acid or 1gm

flunitrazepam) - Any quantity

1st Offense  Not more than 20 years  If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more than life  Fine $1 million individual, $5 million not individual  Supervised release at least 3 years

2nd Offense  Not more than 30 years  If death or serious injury, life  Fine $2 million individual, $10 million not individual  Supervised release at least 6 years

Controlled Substances Act Schedule III Drugs & Quantities: All (included in Schedule III are anabolic steroids, codeine with aspirin or Tylenol®, and some barbiturates) - Any quantity

1st Offense  Not more than 10 years  If death or serious injury, not more than 15 years  Fine not more than $500,000 individual, $2.5 million not individual  Supervised release at least 2 years

2nd Offense  Not more than 20 years  If death or serious injury, not more than 30 years  fine not more than $1 million individual, $5 million not individual  Supervised release at least 4 years

Controlled Substances Act Schedule IV Drugs & Quantities: All (included in Schedule IV are Darvon®, Talwin®, Equanil®, Valium®, and Xanax®) - Any

1st Offense  Not more than 5 years  Fine not more than $250,000 individual, $1 million not individual  Supervised release at least 1 year

2nd Offense  Not more than 10 years  Fine not more than $500,000 individual, $2 million not individual  Supervised release at least 2 years

Controlled Substances Act Schedule V Drugs & Quantities: All (over-the-counter cough medicines with codeine are classified in Schedule V) - Any

1st Offense  Not more than 1 year  Fine not more than $100,000 individual, $250,000 not individual

2nd Offense  Not more than 4 years  Fine not more than $500,000 individual, $1 million not individual  Supervised release not more than 1 year

Description

Quantity

Marijuana

1,000 kg or more

1st Offense 

Not less than 10

2nd Offense 

Not less than 20 years,

mixture or substance, or

years, not more than

not more than life (life

1,000 or more plants

life

imprisonment if 3rd



offense)

If death or serious injury, not less than



20 years, not more than life 

life imprisonment 

Fine not more than $20

Fine not more than

million individual, $75

$10 million

million other than

individual, $50

individual

million other than



individual 

If death or serious injury,

Supervised release at least 10 years

Supervised release at least 5 years

Marijuana

100 kg or more mixture



Not less than 5

or substance, or 100 or

years, not more than

more plants

40 years 



more than life 

If death or serious injury, not less than 20 years, not more

Not less than 10 years, not

If death or serious injury, life imprisonment



Fine not more than $8 million individual, $50

Description

Quantity

1st Offense

2nd Offense

than life 

million other than individual

Fine not more than $5 million



individual, $25

Supervised release at least 8 years

million other than individual 

Supervised release at least 4 years

Marijuana,

Less than 50 kg

Hashish,

marijuana, 10 kg

Hashish oil

hashish, or 1 kg hashish



Not more than 5 years



oil; 1-49 plants**



Not more than 10 years



Fine $500,000 individual,

Fine not more than

$2 million other than

$250,000

individual

individual, $1



Supervised release 4 years

million other than individual 

Supervised release 2 years

*Penalties may include prison terms and/or fines. The Controlled Substances Act (1970) places all substances regulated under federal law into one of five schedules based on the substance’s medical use, potential for abuse, and safety or dependence liability. 21 U.S.C. 844 (a) Simple Possession 1st conviction: Up to 1 year imprisonment and/or fined at least $1,000.

**Distributing a small amount of marijuana for noremuneration is treated as simple possession. After 1 prior drug conviction: At least 15 days in prison, not to exceed 2 years, and fined at least $2,500. After 2 or more prior drug convictions: At least 90 days in prison, not to exceed 3 years, and fined at least $5,000. 21 U.S.C. 853 (a)(2) and 881(a)(7) Forfeiture of personal and real property used to possess or facilitate possession of a controlled substance if that offense is punishable by more than 1 year imprisonment (see special sentencing provisions re: crack). 21 U.S.C. 881 (a)(4) Forfeiture of vehicles, boats, aircraft, or any conveyance used to transport or conceal a controlled substance. 21 U.S.C. 862 (a) Denial of federal benefits such as student loans, grants, contracts, and professional and commercial licenses, up to 5 years for first offense, up to 10 years for the second offense, and permanently upon the third offense. 18 U.S.C. 922 (g) Ineligible to possess, receive, or purchase a firearm. Miscellaneous Revocation of certain federal licenses and benefits, e.g., pilot licenses, public housing tenancy, etc., are vested within the authorities of individual federal agencies. Note: These are only federal penalties and sanctions. Additional state penalties and sanctions may apply.

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